Twenty things you probably didn’t know about Viagra…

Posted by: on Oct 25, 2013 | No Comments

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1. Viagra is not an aphrodisiac. It will only cause erection if you are sexually aroused. There is, as yet, no pill to cure a boring or unattractive partner.

2. Men who take Viagra without consulting their partners can create trust issues. A study by New Zealand’s University of Canterbury found that women surveyed (age 33-68) had a number of concerns about their partner taking ED drugs, ranging from the loss of spontaneity to the suspected infidelity they feared might result.

3. Most men don’t renew their prescriptions. Dr Abraham Morgentaler, a urologist at Harvard Medical School and president of the U.S. Men’s Health Forum, and author of ‘The Viagra Myth’ says that the majority of men who take Viagra do not continue taking it, not because the medication is not effective, but because it causes more probems than it solves in their relationships.

4. Viagra works by dilating blood vessels throughout the body, allowing blood to flow more readily to the heart, lungs and other organs. In addition, Viagra relaxes smooth muscle contractions in the penis. About 70 percent of men using it report some improvement in achieving and maintaining an erection.

5. Viagra comes in three strengths, 25mg, 50mg and 100mg. The starting dose is usually 50 mg but men older than 65 years of age will be started on 25mg. The blue diamond shaped tablet needs to be taken roughly one hour before sex. The tablets begin to work within 30 minutes and the effect lasts for about five hours.

6. Unless your ED is related to certain medical conditions you can’t get Viagra tablets free on the NHS, however your GP can write you a private prescription.

7. Four tablets of Viagra can now be bought over the counter at Boots without a doctor’s prescription if you are wiling to have a blood pressure and diabetes test.

8. Viagra is expensive. To buy 8 x 50mg tablets costs roughly £42.48. It is much cheaper to buy 4x100mg tablets for £23.48 and cut them in half with a sharp knife.

9. As many as half of the Viagra anti-impotence pills sold on the Internet could be fake. A study of online Viagra carried out by Dr Nic Wilson, of the University of London found that around half the tablets were counterfeit and contained different components or less of the active ingredient than real Viagra. 2 Men who bypass their GP and order tablets on the internet could be ignoring underlying cardiovascular or metabolic problems.

10. Viagra now has stiff competition. When Viagra was launched in 1998 it was the only drug of its kind. It now has two competitors and Pfizers shareLevitra can act in as little as 16 minutes compared with 30 to 60 minutes for Viagra. And Works for up to 6 hours. It is considered to have fewer side effects. Cialis is often the first choice for new patients because its “window” of effectiveness is up to 36 hours, considerably longer than the other two treatments. This can mean that there is less pressure to “time” your sexual activity and therefore can lead to a more relaxed and spontaneous experience. However, the side effects are said to be greater possibly because the active ingredient remains longer in the body

11. Viagra has side effects. The most common ones are headache, flushing, dizziness palpitations, indigestion and blurred or blue tinged vision. In 2005 and 2007 the FDA instructed Pfizer to advise users of the risk of blindness and deafness. Viagra can be fatal if used in combination with nitrates, the drugs prescribed to treat heart problems such as angina.

12. Very rarely Viagra causes Priapism: persistent (4 hrs +) painful erection of the penis. Treatment of this condition should not be delayed more than 6 hours, as this can cause damage to the erectile tissue in the penis and irreversible erectile dysfunction.

13. Viagra is now being linked to male infertility. A study carried out by Dr David Glenn, a consultant gynaecologist at Queen’s University Belfast has revealed that Viagra damages sperm quality and men who take the drug recreationally could be ruining their chance of fathering a child. Sperm exposed to the drug is more active than untreated sperm, but the cap-like structure that produces enzymes that help sperm penetrate the egg breaks open too early preventing the sperm getting into the egg. Another test found mice that had been given Viagra produced 40 per cent fewer embryos than other mice.

14. Viagra is being used as a recreational drug on the club circuit to counterbalance the effects of as cocaine, ecstasy and amphetamines which inhibit erection. It’s a risky business. Mixing ‘poppers’ (amyl nitrate) with Viagra for example, can lead to a drastic drop in blood pressure and can cause stroke, heart attack or death.

15. Men can become dependent on it. As Viagra and its competitors become increasingly acceptable as “lifestyle” drugs it is important for men to realise that the side-effects of a Viagra habit are not just physical. Men take “thrill pills” because they believe that they will make average sex into something more special. For a horny 25-year-old male that belief is usually enough – 30 per cent of men in clinical trials of Viagra had better erections despite taking only a placebo. The problems start when men who are otherwise healthy start to rely on it. And yes, Viagraholics Anonymousalready exists.

16. It was discovered by accident. Pfizer, the world’s biggest pharmaceutical company, stumbled on the drug by accident at their research labs in Sandwich, Kent. In the late 1980s, they had been developing a new treatment for angina, but noticed a strange side-effect in trials – increased erections among volunteers. The effect on their sex lives was so marked that once the angina trails were over the volunteers wanted to keep on taking the medication.

17. Viagra was launched in 1998. The blue diamond-shaped tablets (which have the chemical name sildenafil) became the fastest-selling drug in history and Pfizer’s share price doubled. Viagra has created a £1.5bn worldwide market in anti-impotence pills. Nearly 37 million tablets for erectile dysfunction (ED) have been prescribed in Britain to date.

18. The sales pitch has changed. When Pfizer first launched Viagra in the US, its advertising campaign had a serious, educational tone and was fronted by Senator Bob Dole. By the time Viagra’s first rival, Levitra, was launched, Bayer, the manufacturer, was unashamedly targeting those seeking to enhance sexual satisfaction. Its ad campaign featured a young man who fails to shoot a ball through a tyre until the word Levitra is mentioned. At which point he is joined by his beautiful smiling wife and begins to score repeatedly.To maintain its lead in the market, Pfizer is fought back with a campaign playing up the brand’s Nascar auto-racing sponsorship. it featured handsome young drivers in race cars, with a voiceover saying: “Gentlemen, start your engines.”

19. In the hope of discovering ‘Pink Viagra’ Pfizer set up a female sexual dysfunction unit to investigate the effectiveness of Viagra as a treatment for women suffering from loss of libido. When they compared the effects of Viagra to the effects of a placebo they stopped the study because 85 per cent of the women responded to the placebo. It seems that even the very idea of Viagra is enough to make some women aroused.

20. The ‘Viagra Divorce’ has arrived. Dominic Barbara, who heads up a successful Manhattan law firm with 15 attorneys says that in about one of every 15 or 20 new divorce cases, somebody mentions Viagra.

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